A new experience for your self-care regimen.

When was the last time it was so quiet that you could hear the rhythm of your breath? So still you could feel your heart beating in your chest? So calm that nothing else mattered?

For me, it was just a few hours before writing this.

I consider myself well-versed in self-care tools and methods. I practice silence and solitude. I enjoy meditation and retreats. I indulge myself with facials and massages, and I even own a hot tub. So I was excited to add a new experience to my wellness regimen thanks to Clarity Float Spa.

The floating experience has been popularized by figures like NBA MVP Stephen Curry and promises to provide a space to melt away the worries, remove distractions, and expose new layers of tranquility. A promise of 90 minutes in a saltwater cabin designed to create a near zero-gravity state and limited sensory environment. A chance to be alone, enhance my clarity and creativity, and experience nothingness. Pure bliss.

And it was.

But first I had to get over the awkwardness and embarrassment of trying something for the first time — not knowing what to expect and being afraid I would somehow do it wrong.

More specifically, I had to get past stripping off my clothes, removing my makeup, and showering in near darkness in someone else’s bathroom. I mean, what’s a girl to do with the clumps of hair that always seem to come out of her head when she washes it? And where was that trash can? I felt exposed.

And what about flailing around in the shallow 93.5-degree water, feet in the air, trying to get my arms and neck situated so I could relax? I felt so clumsy.

But after a while, it all came together. I felt weightless, suspended in air. A complete sense of calm. My to-do list from an hour before still touched my sense of awareness, but it seemed unimportant. Time stood still, or moved quickly. I’m not sure because it didn’t matter.

No one was calling me or needing me. My world was completely dark and quiet. I felt empowered.

After some time, my senses began to awaken. I had the urge to wiggle my toes, to stick my ears above the water line and listen to the occasional drip of water from something, somewhere. I moved my arms, pointed and flexed my feet, and even tried a few water ballet moves.

Why not? It was my time and no one was watching.

Just as I wondered how long it had been, soft music began playing, signaling my session had ended. I stood up, my skin tingling and feeling refreshed.

I got dressed and headed out, feeling more connected to myself and the world around me. I was ready for a glass of moscato, my fuzzy blanket, and whatever life might throw at me next.

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